Tag Archives: employers

Pay Attention When You Get Paid

Over the past couple of months, it has been hard to avoid the noise coinciding with what is formally known as the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act. Now that the bill has passed, and much of that noise has become a reality, the consequences of the reform are impossible to avoid.

While the broader effects of the new legislation are yet to be seen, there are some components of the law that will have an effect on the majority of Americans within the next few weeks.

On January 11, 2018, the IRS released Notice 1036, which serves to update employers on how much federal tax they should be withholding from their employee’s paychecks. Implementation of the new withholding amounts (as adjusted for the new tax landscape) is to begin “as soon as possible, but not later than February 15th, 2018”. To put it simply, this means that many of us will see a change in our take home pay very soon.

You may recall filling out a Form W-4 when you began your employment? That form is what your employer uses to calculate the amount of federal income tax they should remit from your paycheck. Using the updated withholding tables released with Notice 1036, employers will be adjusting their employees’ paychecks to more accurately cover their (new) income tax liability.

Here is what is important to remember: while employers can accurately determine the amount of tax owed based off of the wages they pay their employees, they have no way of considering the other elements that factor into an employee’s tax situation. Taxpayers need to consider a more involved approach at determining what their overall tax liability will be. In order to do so, each of us needs to develop an understanding of the new tax laws, and applicably determine how the new laws will affect them.

Take for example, an employee who gets compensated for mileage. In the past, the compensation was likely included on the employee’s W-2, as taxable income. On their tax return, the employee would pick up the mileage compensation as part of their taxable wages, then deduct the mileage as an unreimbursed business expense on Schedule A. Now, however, as a result of the recent tax reform, that deduction for unreimbursed business expenses is no longer available; meaning that the mileage compensation will still be included as taxable income, but there will no longer be an offsetting deduction. If taxpayers aren’t proactive in making sure that they appropriately adjust their withholdings, they could potentially be in for quite a surprise when they file their tax return in April of 2019.

There has a been a lot of curiosity amongst our clients lately; many of them have been asking us how they will fare under the new tax law. It is not necessary, and it might even be unwise, to wait until you file your 2018 tax return to get your answer. The tax reform act certainly did create change. If you pay federal income tax, it will bode you well to consult your tax advisor sooner rather than later; taking a comprehensive look at your new tax environment now can help you plan ahead.

John Massey is a Senior Accountant at Perry, Fitts, Boulette & Fitton CPAs. He helps individuals and businesses with tax planning preparation and works on compiled and reviewed financial statements for businesses. He can be reached at jmassey@pfbf.com or 873-1603.

Business Owners: On Your Mark, Get Set, Go!

The start of the New Year marks the beginning of the IRS  informational reporting season that will keep most business owner’s heads spinning. None are overbearing or difficult unless, of course, you don’t get them right the first time. Failure to correctly file W-2 and 1099 forms could get 2017 off to a not-so-happy start.

Wage reporting statements:

W-2 forms must be furnished to employees and filed with the Social Security Administration no later than January 31, 2017. It is possible to request a 30 day extension by submitting Form 8809. If errors are made with the initial filing, W-2c forms can be used to correct them. My advice is to work with your tax professional to make sure that you get them right the first time.

The IRS list the most common mistakes such as omitting decimal points and cents, using a font that is too small or large, (12-point Courier font is recommend), and incorrectly checking the “Retirement plan” box.

My experience suggests that a more careful look into the numbers that make up taxable wages will save you both time and money. Here are our top suggestions to correctly file W-2 forms:

    • Incorporated businesses filing form 1120S are required to include fringe benefits into > 2% shareholder’s taxable income. Fringes include: health insurance, HSA plans, and personal use of company owned vehicles. You should contact your payroll provider to make sure they have the information needed.
    • Employee business expense reimbursements made under an accountable plan are generally not required to be included on form W-2. Payments made as part of a non-accountable plan must be reported as taxable wages. Be sure to communicate any reimbursement plans to your payroll and tax providers as the substantiation requirement are very strict.
    • Employers Earned Income Credit notice. All employers must notify employees who have no income tax withheld that they may be able to claim an income tax refund as a result of the Earned Income Credit (EIC)

Penalties for failure to correctly file W-2 forms by the due date can range from $50 to $260 per W-2.

Informational returns:

Warning, this is not for the faint of heart! There are over 30 informational returns that a business might be required to be file including payments for: interest, dividends and rents. Reporting is also required for payments to: foreign persons, crew members of fishing boats, and attorneys.

1099 MISC Forms that report nonemployee compensation are required to be filed for all non-incorporated service providers, not considered to be employees, who have been paid more than $600.

Many business owners consider these filings as trivial and not worth the effort. Sound familiar? Please heed my warning, these informational returns are essential to the U.S. Treasury that failure to correctly file them can and carry penalties ranging from $50-260 per informational return. Small Business Owners do have the special privilege of having the penalty capped at $1,064,000 per year.

As you look to start 2017 on the right foot, I suggest that you take the time to meet with your tax professional and payroll provider to make sure that your informational returns are filed right the first time.

About the Author: Jamie Boulette, CPA has 30 years of tax experience and is managing director of Perry, Fitts, Boulette & Fitton CPAs with offices in Bath and Oakland. He can be reached at jboulette@pfbf.com or 371-8002.